Reading in 2010

It’s December, and so I am now taking recommendations for books to read in 2010. Leave a comment with a book you think I ought to read next year. Especially interesting for a variety of reasons: books on urbanism, accessible tomes on philosophy (particularly Heidegger, Arendt, de Beauvoir, and the “trinity” of postmodern theorists), literary theory, biographies, poetry, literacy/language, and the practice of writing. I’m pretty good at finding fiction and essays, but you can recommend something if you really liked it.

(Nothing with vampires in it, please.)

3 thoughts on “Reading in 2010

  1. Some of these are my absolute favorites that I try to make everyone read; some of them are ones that I read for the first time recently.

    A Death in the Family (James Agee)
    The Gum Thief (Douglas Coupland)
    The Gun Seller (Hugh Laurie)
    The Heart of the Matter (Graham Greene)
    Infinite Jest (David Foster Wallace)
    The Invention of Hugo Cabret
    Man’s Search for Meaning (Viktor Frankl)
    The Metropolis (Elizabeth Gaffney)
    Paris Trout (Pete Dexter)
    Revenge (Stephen Fry)
    A Soldier of the Great War (Mark Helprin)
    The Straight Man (Richard Russo)
    Tree of Smoke (Denis Johnston)

    Can also offer you a sizable “To Avoid Reading” list, should you find yourself in need of one.

  2. Mountains Beyond Mountains by Tracy Kidder; Death Comes To The Archbishop by Willa Cather; Explaining Magnetism by Maura Dooley (poetry); Mr. Ives’ Christmas by Oscar Hijuelos; Oracle Bones by Peter Hessler; Confessions by Augustine; Praise Seeking Understanding by Jason Byassee; Brother To A Dragonfly by Will Campbell. A great idea…

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